workplace breastfeeding – Kindred Media https://www.kindredmedia.org Sharing the New Story of Childhood, Parenthood, and the Human Family Sat, 19 Sep 2020 16:20:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.1.6 https://www.kindredmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/cropped-Kindred-Black-Logo-square-32x32.png workplace breastfeeding – Kindred Media https://www.kindredmedia.org 32 32 Work Life Law – Breastfeeding and Paid Parenting Leave https://www.kindredmedia.org/2019/06/work-life-law-breastfeeding-and-paid-parenting-leave/ https://www.kindredmedia.org/2019/06/work-life-law-breastfeeding-and-paid-parenting-leave/#respond Sun, 09 Jun 2019 16:24:17 +0000 http://www.kindredmedia.org/?p=22555 Kindred articles on Paid Parental Leave and Paid Family Leave Kindred articles and videos on Worksite Breastfeeding-Friendly Law   National Workplace Breastfeeding Resources Break Time for Nursing Mothers Law. See the Center for Worklife Law’s extensive study into the limited provisions of this law. EXPLOSED: Discrimination Against Breastfeeding Workers. This first comprehensive report on breastfeeding discrimination reveals […]]]>

Kindred articles on Paid Parental Leave and Paid Family Leave

Kindred articles and videos on Worksite Breastfeeding-Friendly Law

 

National Workplace Breastfeeding Resources

Break Time for Nursing Mothers Law. See the Center for Worklife Law’s extensive study into the limited provisions of this law.

EXPLOSED: Discrimination Against Breastfeeding Workers. This first comprehensive report on breastfeeding discrimination reveals widespread and devastating consequences for breastfeeding workers.

United States Breastfeeding Committee -See a full list of the federal law, provisions and FAQs here.

The Business Case for Breastfeeding. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HRSA).  Worksite lactation support information and toolkit for employers and employees.

What Employers Need to Know – US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Women’s Health 

State Level Workplace Breastfeeding Rights – US Department of Labor

Investing In Workplace Breastfeeding Programs and Policies, from the National Business Group on Health

Creating a Breastfeeding Friendly Workplace Strategy, A Toolkit for Employers

 

 

Paid Family Leave Resources

Connecticut Permanent Commission on the Status of Women

PL+US. Paid Leave for the United States. s the national campaign to win paid family leave by 2022. Founded by Katie Bethell, who Fortune Magazine named one of the world’s greatest leaders, the organization in partnership with employees, employers, consumers, and investors has won paid family leave for nearly 6 million at companies like Walmart, Starbucks, CVS and more.

Report of the Family Medical Leave Insurance Taskforce

National Parternship for Women and Families 

Expecting Better (2014)

2014 Leave Legislation

2013 Family Leave Legislation

2012 Family Leave Legislation

Family, Sick and Parental Leave Laws

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Breastfeeding Moms Face Illegal Discrimination at Work https://www.kindredmedia.org/2019/02/breastfeeding-moms-face-illegal-discrimination-at-work/ https://www.kindredmedia.org/2019/02/breastfeeding-moms-face-illegal-discrimination-at-work/#respond Tue, 26 Feb 2019 21:36:57 +0000 http://www.kindredmedia.org/?p=22298 A new report shows widespread discrimination. A recent report summarizes the many kinds of discrimination breastfeeding mothers face at work in the United States. Here is part of one of the examples given: An emergency room nurse was bullied, harassed and not accommodated for the need to pump during her long shifts: “My reason to go […]]]>

A new report shows widespread discrimination.

A recent report summarizes the many kinds of discrimination breastfeeding mothers face at work in the United States. Here is part of one of the examples given:

An emergency room nurse was bullied, harassed and not accommodated for the need to pump during her long shifts: “My reason to go into nursing was to help people, so I would never leave a patient in need,” said Barbara, but she needed coverage from her coworkers to take regular pumping breaks. Instead she was told, “just give your kid formula.” After 3 months of struggling against her unsupportive workplace, she quit.

Breastfeeding is natural, normal and necessary for babies’ optimal growth. The World Health Organization suggests at least two years of breastfeeding (six months exclusive). However, the typical age for weaning in our ancestral context is four years and many mothers spaced children years apart to accommodate this pattern (Hewlett & Lamb, 2005).

Breastfeeding is linked to a child’s overall better mental and physical health, including a lower risk of obesity and even Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and to mother’s better health.

Breastmilk has hundreds if not thousands of ingredients, is tailored to the gender of the child, and changes based on the needs of the child.

Having healthy mothers and children are signs of a strong, sustainable wisesociety.

Here is a list of some of the discriminatory behaviors mothers experience that are discussed in the report (quoted from the summary):

  • denying pumping break requests from employees who are in pain and leaking milk;
  • firing them just for asking;
  • refusing to provide privacy, leaving workers to pump milk with their breasts exposed to coworkers, clients, and the public in physically unsafe conditions;
  • commenting on their “tits,” comparing breastfeeding workers to animals, and mooing at them.

The report points out that “breastfeeding workers have legal rights.” Specifically, for example (quoted from the report):

  • The Break Time for Nursing Mothers Law gives many employees a right to break time and private space to express breast milk for their nursing child during the first year of life.
  • Rights under the federal employment discrimination statute, Title VII, have expanded over the last decade. Discrimination based on breastfeeding and lactation is now prohibited.
  • Just over half of all states have enacted legislation to provide additional rights. These range from limited laws requiring public schoolboards to maintain lactation policies to sweeping laws giving robust accommodation”

But the facts are that more than 9 million female workers of childbearing age (almost 1/4) are not covered by the federal Break Time for Nursing Mothers law (including registered nurses, kindergarten teachers, farmworkers). Even for those who are covered by the law, technicalities make it hard to enforce so there is widespread noncompliance. Even when there is compliance, the accommodations often are insufficient.

Follow The Evolved Nest for updates on Darcia’s work as well as new podcast releases!

So, what can be done?

The report lists seven components for a Model Lactation Policy:

1. Universal coverage (all public and private workplaces no matter the size)

2. Reasonable accommodations

3. No employer exemptions

4. Recognition of diverse physical needs and circumstances (e.g., adequate and flexible break schedule, no infant age limits, all gender identities).

5. Functional space requirements (e.g., nearby, private, sanitary, equipped properly).

6. Economically realistic

One thing all of us can do: support breastfeeding generally, and breastfeeding moms and babies specifically, wherever we go.

 

References

Hewlett, B. S., & Lamb, M. E. (2005). Hunter-gatherer childhoods: Evolutionary, developmental and cultural perspectives. New Brunswick, NJ: Aldine.

Photo Shutterstock/Photonier

 

WORKPLACE BREASTFEEDING RESOURCES

How Can We Reduce Workplace Bias Against Caregivers? University of California, Center for Worklife Law

EXPLOSED: Discrimination Against Breastfeeding Workers. This first comprehensive report on breastfeeding discrimination reveals widespread and devastating consequences for breastfeeding workers.

Promoting Worker Well-Being through Maternal and Child Health: Breastfeeding Accommodations in the Workplace. US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention blog on February 11, 2019.

The graphic above will lead employers to a complete guide on implementing a lactation-friendly workplace, while the links below provide more insight into laws, toolkits, resources and support for professionals, educators, mothers and human resources departments. Please contact us if you know of a resource that should appear here.

Break Time for Nursing Mothers Law. See the Center for Worklife Law’s extensive study into the limited provisions of this law.

EXPLOSED: Discrimination Against Breastfeeding Workers. This first comprehensive report on breastfeeding discrimination reveals widespread and devastating consequences for breastfeeding workers.

United States Breastfeeding Committee -See a full list of the federal law, provisions and FAQs here.

The Business Case for Breastfeeding. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HRSA).  Worksite lactation support information and toolkit for employers and employees.

What Employers Need to Know – US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Women’s Health

State Level Workplace Breastfeeding Rights – US Department of Labor

Investing In Workplace Breastfeeding Programs and Policies, from the National Business Group on Health

Creating a Breastfeeding Friendly Workplace Strategy, A Toolkit for Employers

 

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New Groundbreaking Report from WorkLife Law Shows Widespread Breastfeeding Discrimination https://www.kindredmedia.org/2018/12/new-groundbreaking-report-from-worklife-law-shows-widespread-breastfeeding-discrimination/ https://www.kindredmedia.org/2018/12/new-groundbreaking-report-from-worklife-law-shows-widespread-breastfeeding-discrimination/#respond Tue, 18 Dec 2018 03:07:03 +0000 http://www.kindredmedia.org/?p=23581 The latest report from the University of California at Hastings Center for Worklife Law’s new report, Exposed: Discrimination Against Breastfeeding Workers, analyzes breastfeeding legal cases from the last decade to document patterns of discrimination, and analyzes new data on the scope of existing state and federal laws to protect against discrimination. The center found that 27.6 million women of […]]]>

The latest report from the University of California at Hastings Center for Worklife Law’s new report, Exposed: Discrimination Against Breastfeeding Workers, analyzes breastfeeding legal cases from the last decade to document patterns of discrimination, and analyzes new data on the scope of existing state and federal laws to protect against discrimination. The center found that 27.6 million women of childbearing age don’t have the basic protections needed by all breastfeeding workers.

Read the report by clicking on the image.

“Breastfeeding discrimination is widespread and can have devastating consequences for women and their families” says Liz Morris, report co-author. “Despite a patchwork of laws giving legal rights to breastfeeding employees, millions still do not have the basic legal protections they need. Workers are losing their jobs to feed their babies. We’ve outlined a common sense policy solution that would fix this.”

The study found that while breastfeeding discrimination exists in many industries, it is most acute in male-dominated sectors.  First responders, law enforcement, and other women in predominantly-male industries make up only 16% of women workers, but account for nearly half (43%) of breastfeeding discrimination claims. Workers in pink collar professions, such as nurses and teachers, are often left out of federal legal protections for breastfeeding workers.

“Our community helpers, like first responders and teachers, have given so much to us–yet we haven’t even given them the basic breastfeeding time and space they deserve” says Jessica Lee, report co-author. “Action is needed by the states to ensure all workers are protected, not just the lucky ones.”

The report features the stories of breastfeeding women who struggled with a lack of accommodations, hostility, and retaliation, including an NYPD police officer, an emergency room nurse, a kindergarten teacher, and a U.S. Air Force Airman. 

Authored by Liz MorrisJessica Lee, and Joan C. Williams, the report examines the consequences of breastfeeding discrimination, breastfeeding workers’ legal rights, and how current legal protections leave workers exposed. It offers the seven components of a model policy states can enact to ensure breastfeeding workers are able to earn a living for their families without jeopardizing their health. 

The report is released alongside a first-of-its-kind interactive map of state laws that impact breastfeeding workers, available here. Breastfeeding workers, health care providers, and employers seeking information about breastfeeding accommodations, laws, and policies can visit our online resource center PregnantAtWork.org.

The Center for WorkLife Law’s family responsibilities discrimination research and educational outreach, including Exposed: Discrimination Against Breastfeeding Workers and PregnantAtWork.org, are funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and the NoVo Foundation.

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